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11 Ways to Lower Cholesterol Naturally Without Meds

cardiology Nov 18, 2022
Lower Cholesterol Naturally

11 Ways to Lower Cholesterol Naturally

"Do I have to take statins?"

That's the number one question I get on social media, quickly followed by, 

"How can I lower my cholesterol without medications?"

If you've been told that you have high cholesterol levels, you may be wondering how to lower your cholesterol without resorting to medications. While medications such as statins can be effective at lowering cholesterol levels, they may not be suitable or necessary for everyone. In this article, we'll explore natural ways to lower cholesterol and improve your overall heart health.

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What Is Cholesterol?

What is cholesterol and why do we care?

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that's produced by mostly by liver and found in the bloodstream. Approximately 95% of circulating cholesterol is from your liver, not from your diet.  While it is essential for the body to function properly, you do not actually need to consume it. Your body can make it.

Unfortunately, high levels of cholesterol in the blood can increase the risk of heart disease and this is the main problem with cholesterol.

 

Types of Cholesterol

There are two main types of cholesterol. The good and the bad. LDL (low-density lipoprotein) is generally referred to as bad cholesterol. While HDL (high-density lipoprotein) is usually referred to as good cholesterol. The reason LDL is "bad" is because high levels of LDL can build up in the walls of the arteries, forming plaque that can narrow or block the arteries and increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. LDL has been shown in studies to directly cause atherosclerotic heart disease. (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28444290/)

On the other hand, HDL is often referred to as the "good" cholesterol because it helps remove cholesterol from plaques and helps reduce plaque in your arteries and lowers the risk of heart disease.

 

What is LDL (Bad Cholesterol)?

LDL (low density lipoprotein) is usually called "bad cholesterol" because it correlates the highest, and even cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Lifelong expsoure to high LDL will cause coronary artery disease without question. (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28444290/)

Unfortunately, we have too many "health gurus" online telling people that LDL doesn't matter and it's ok to be high. Which goes against thousands, if not millions of research articles. Can you find a few studies that may show that? Sure, but you need to evaluate the totality of evidence. Not base your entire existence on the results of a one off study!

High LDL cholesterol is the single most important risk factor for heart disease, which is still the single leading cause of death worldwide.

While there are a multitude of medications available now that can effectively lower LDL cholesterol, some people want to try natural methods first. If you're looking to lower your LDL levels without medications, here are some evidence-based strategies to consider:

Can Diet Lower Cholesterol?

While cholesterol is 90% genetic (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30528924/), there are some dietary modifications you can make to lower cholesterol with diet. One of the most effective dietary patterns for reducing LDL is the Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes plant-based foods, healthy fats, and lean proteins. A systematic review of 13 randomized controlled trials found that the Mediterranean diet reduced LDL levels by an average of 18.5 mg/dL. (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S266614972200038X)

Another dietary pattern that has been shown to lower LDL is the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet, which is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy. A systematic review of 27 randomized controlled trials found that the DASH diet reduced LDL levels by an average of 8.3 mg/dL. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8396128/)

Now, let's look at some natural ways to lower LDL cholesterol:

  1. Eat a heart-healthy diet. A healthy diet is an important foundation for good heart health, and there are certain foods that have been shown to be particularly effective at lowering LDL cholesterol. The most researched and proven diet is the Mediterranean diet. You will be avoid saturated fat, eating fruit, fiber, whole grains, lean meats, olive oil, legumes, beans, and tons of vegetables. Grab my Mediterranean Diet weight loos cookbook to lose weight while eating delicious, heart healthy foods.
  2. Reduce intake of saturated fat. Saturated fats are solid at room temperature; butter, bacon, cheese, lard, margarine, fat on steak, chicken skin, red meat, coconut oil, trans fats. These raise your LDL which causes heart disease (blockages in your arteries). (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32428300/)
  3.  Increase soluble fiber intake. Soluble fiber, which is found in foods such as fruits, vegetables, oats, barley, beans, apples, and pears, can help lower LDL cholesterol levels by binding to cholesterol and carrying it out of the body through your intestinalis tract and colon. According to a review of 11 studies published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, increasing soluble fiber intake by 5 to 10 grams per day can lower LDL cholesterol levels by 3 to 5 percent as well as reduce blood sugar and insulin resistance. Soluble fiber can also help lower LDL by binding to cholesterol in the gut and preventing its absorption. If you can't get enough fiber from diet, psyllium fiber like Metamucil, which is very cheap, can help you increase your fiber intake. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5413815/, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6566984/)

  4. Increase intake of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Unlike saturated fats, these are considered "healthy fats". They are found in olive oil, nuts, and avocados and have shown that they can lower LDL cholesterol levels and increase HDL cholesterol levels and thereby reduce cardiovascular risk and mortality as well as non-fatal cardiovascular event rates. This effect is especially profound if they are used as a replacement for saturated fat. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6517012/, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6513455/)

  5. Increase intake of plant sterols and stanols. These plant compounds, which are found in foods such as vegetable oil spreads, orange juice, and granola bars, can help lower LDL cholesterol levels by blocking the absorption of cholesterol in the body. Similar to how soluble fiber would work. However, there is no long term data that suggests they lower mortality. More studies need to be done, but we know that lowering LDL will reduce cardiovascular events and mortality. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6130982/, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9273387/)

  6. Eat more nuts. Nuts, particularly almonds, pistachios, and walnuts, have been shown to lower LDL cholesterol levels and improve cholesterol ratios in some studies as well as reduce all-cause mortality. Several studies have found that consuming nuts, particularly almonds and walnuts, can lower LDL levels, reduce cardiovascular risk, cardiovascular mortality, and even all-cause mortality.(https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9776667/)

  7. Exercise regularly. This one is obvious. The more "cardio" you do, the better your "cardio" outcomes! Physical activity of all types lowers LDL cholesterol levels and improves heart health and cardiovascular outcomes. The American Heart Association recommends at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity exercise per week. A systematic review of 39 randomized controlled trials found that exercise, both aerobic and resistance training, reduced LDL levels by an average of 5.3 mg/dL. Further, an article in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology demonstrated a dose response to exercise. The more you exercised, the more you reduced cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.  (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3906547/, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4262114/https://www.jacc.org/doi/10.1016/j.jacc.2014.11.022)

  8. Quit smoking and Vaping. Smoking damages the inside lining of your arteries and increases the risk of heart disease and every type of cancer. This includes all types of smoking, hookah, vaping, weed, cigars, etc. Quitting smoking can help lower LDL cholesterol levels and reduce cardiovascular mortality, as well as all-cause mortality. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6483019/, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31462607/ https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35612935/, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33574049/, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32487933/ )

  9. Reduce stress. Find ways to reduce stress in your life. Chronic stress increases LDL cholesterol levels and causes ASCVD. Stress raises cortisol levels, which can cause weight gain and salt retention. Try to find healthy ways to manage stress, such as through exercise, meditation, massage, acupuncture, lifting weight, yoga, swimming, running, reading, or spending time with loved ones. Engaging in stress-reducing activities, such as meditation, yoga, and exercise, can help lower LDL and improve overall health. (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22473079/, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29213140/, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32791843/)

  10. Consider supplements. I'm not a big fan of supplements, but some people are adamant and want to try. Some supplements, such as fiber, plant sterols, stanols, and red yeast rice, have been shown in some studies to lower LDL cholesterol levels. You have to be very careful because these are not regulated and not FDA controlled. You may be buying a bottle of "red yeast rice" which does not contain any red yeast rice. Since red yeast rice is lovastatin, you might as well take prescription lovastatin so that you actually know how much you are getting and we can dose it properly. Talk to your cardiologist. Many of these will react with medications and it;s imprtant to cross check. Make sure they are third party tested and actually contain what these say they contain.

  11. Improve sleep. Sleep is important for overall health and well-being, and it may also have an effect on LDL levels. A systematic review of 10 randomized controlled trials found that increasing sleep duration was associated with a reduction in LDL levels. Aim for 7-9 hours of sleep per night. (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26972035/, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28477772/)

There you have it! Those are the best ways to lower cholesterol without medications and improve heart health. Grab my Actual Weight Loss book for more information like this!

 

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